Iraq, One Year Later: A Cabby's Perspective NPR's Ivan Watson sees Baghdad through the eyes of a taxi driver. Ala Lefta is the driver and co-owner of one of the thousands of Korean-made mini-bus taxis that ferry passengers across the Iraqi capital. A year after the U.S. invasion, Ala wants soldiers deployed in the streets to break up the endless traffic jams and remove the danger of carjackers.
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Iraq, One Year Later: A Cabby's Perspective

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Iraq, One Year Later: A Cabby's Perspective

Iraq, One Year Later: A Cabby's Perspective

Iraq, One Year Later: A Cabby's Perspective

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1778052/1778053" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

NPR's Ivan Watson sees Baghdad through the eyes of a taxi driver. Ala Lefta is the driver and co-owner of one of the thousands of Korean-made mini-bus taxis that ferry passengers across the Iraqi capital. A year after the U.S. invasion, Ala wants soldiers deployed in the streets to break up the endless traffic jams and remove the danger of carjackers.

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