Candidates Channel a Prized Thoroughbred The presidential election process is sometimes compared to a horse race. John Edwards and Mike Huckabee take the analogy a step further, comparing themselves to a certain celebrity thoroughbred: Seabiscuit.
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Candidates Channel a Prized Thoroughbred

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Candidates Channel a Prized Thoroughbred

Candidates Channel a Prized Thoroughbred

Candidates Channel a Prized Thoroughbred

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/17854237/17854216" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The presidential election process is sometimes compared to a horse race. John Edwards and Mike Huckabee take the analogy a step further, comparing themselves to a certain celebrity thoroughbred: Seabiscuit.

MELISSA BLOCK, host:

One footnote to today's political news, there can be odd coincidences in politics, candidates groping for the same metaphor, the same theme song or slogan at the same time. Well, today we heard this.

(Soundbite of political speech)

Mr. JOHN EDWARDS (Former Democratic Senator, North Carolina): We are Seabiscuit.

BLOCK: How is that again?

Mr. EDWARDS: We are Seabiscuit. I ask you to join us in this cause.

BLOCK: That's a hoarse John Edwards, comparing himself to a horse today in Manchester, New Hampshire. And he wasn't alone.

(Soundbite of TV program "FOX News")

Mr. MIKE HUCKABEE (Former Republican Governor, Arkansas): I feel like Seabiscuit.

BLOCK: That's Mike Huckabee on FOX News, making his move on the outside.

Mr. HUCKABEE: I mean, let's face it. There's a whole lot of Americans out there who love to know that the underdog can still win.

BLOCK: Seabiscuit, the legendary thoroughbred race horse of the 1930s. Knobby-kneed, awkward, lazy and unlikely champion who started winning and winning and ultimately beat the vaunted favorite War Admiral in the match of the century in 1938 by a lot.

(Soundbite of archived recording)

Unidentified Man: Seabiscuit leads by a length. Now, Seabiscuit by a length and a half. (unintelligible) Seabiscuit by three. Seabiscuit by three. Seabiscuit is the winner by four lengths. And you never saw such a wild crowd.

(Soundbite of music)

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