Dihydrogen Monoxide Sparks Global Concern A Web site is raising alarm about the chemical compound dihydrogen monoxide. The odorless, colorless substance is abundantly available in liquid, solid and gaseous form. Scientists agree that there is no good way to get rid of it. NPR's Robert Siegel talks with professor Tom Way of Villanova University. He maintains a web site with information for people concerned about the substance.
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Dihydrogen Monoxide Sparks Global Concern

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Dihydrogen Monoxide Sparks Global Concern

Dihydrogen Monoxide Sparks Global Concern

Web Site Stirs Debate over 'Dangers' of Common Substance

Dihydrogen Monoxide Sparks Global Concern

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1791960/1791961" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A Web site is raising alarm about the chemical compound dihydrogen monoxide. The odorless, colorless substance is abundantly available in liquid, solid and gaseous form. Its basis is the unstable radical hydroxide, the components of which are found in a number of caustic, explosive and poisonous compounds. One city in Orange County, Calif., considered banning Styrofoam cups because they contained the compound.

NPR's Robert Siegel talks with Professor Tom Way of Villanova University. He maintains a Web site with information for people concerned about dihydrogen monoxide — which is more commonly known as H20, or water.