TV's Judge Alex Goes to the Supreme Court While television's Judge Alex usually measures his success in ratings for his TV show of the same name, he's now turning to the Supreme Court. He's looking to the justices' votes in a contract dispute with his manager.
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TV's Judge Alex Goes to the Supreme Court

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TV's Judge Alex Goes to the Supreme Court

Law

TV's Judge Alex Goes to the Supreme Court

TV's Judge Alex Goes to the Supreme Court

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  • Transcript

While television's Judge Alex usually measures his success in ratings for his TV show of the same name, he's now turning to the Supreme Court. He's looking to the justices' votes in a contract dispute with his manager.

RENEE MONTAGNE, Host:

And today at the U.S. Supreme Court, there will be one more judge.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "JUDGE ALEX")

U: Judge Alex.

MONTAGNE: NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg explains.

NINA TOTENBERG: Judge Alex will not be in costume today, no robe. He's not appearing as a judge, but as a litigant. In case you've never heard of Judge Alex, here's how they introduce him on TV.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "JUDGE ALEX")

U: As a trial lawyer he fought for the truth, and as a criminal court judge he commanded authority. Now he returns to preside over America's courtroom - Judge Alex.

TOTENBERG: And here's what his show sounds like.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "JUDGE ALEX")

U: He says that when he split up with his ex, she split with his ride.

MONTAGNE: Were any punches being thrown or anything?

U: Yes.

U: A whole lot.

U: A whole lot.

TOTENBERG: Truth be told, the legal facts and questions in this case are horrifically boring. Judge Alex Ferrer and his one-time agent are in a money dispute, and the question is whether state or federal law applies.

MONTAGNE: We're done.

U: All rise.

TOTENBERG: Nina Totenberg, NPR News, Washington.

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