Ending 'Social Promotion' New York City's schools are moving forward with plans to end social promotion, the practice of allowing failing students to advance to the next grade to stay with their peers. The new plan is patterned after Chicago's mandatory retention policy, which after seven years is getting mixed reviews. School officials say holding students back has helped boost test scores, but a new study suggests retention may do more harm than good. NPR's David Schaper reports.
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Ending 'Social Promotion'

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Ending 'Social Promotion'

Ending 'Social Promotion'

Ending 'Social Promotion'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1814827/1814828" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

New York City's schools are moving forward with plans to end social promotion, the practice of allowing failing students to advance to the next grade to stay with their peers. The new plan is patterned after Chicago's mandatory retention policy, which after seven years is getting mixed reviews. School officials say holding students back has helped boost test scores, but a new study suggests retention may do more harm than good. NPR's David Schaper reports.