Sundance: Which Way In? The Sundance Film Festival looks like fun from afar, and now critic Daniel Holloway reveals how you can get a place at the party.
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Sundance: Which Way In?

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Sundance: Which Way In?

Sundance: Which Way In?

Sundance: Which Way In?

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The Sundance Film Festival looks like fun from afar, and now critic Daniel Holloway reveals how you can get a place at the party.

ALISON STEWART, host:

You know, if you've commented to our blog posts over the weekend, you know that, obviously, Sundance isn't all about movies. There's like all this art, you know, about music and more iPhones than you can shake an icicle at. But, yeah, there are these people out there - these people who just want to party. They're stocked with celebrities or pseudo-celebrities, as we mentioned.

We caught up with BPP guest host and Metro paper's movie critic Daniel Holloway - excuse me. He told us a really hilarious story when we ran into him on Main Street yesterday.

DANIEL HOLLOWAY (Film Critic): Anyone can get slagged here and there's this whole industry of like celebrity party cultures - has nothing to do with movies whatsoever, even kind of seems to resent the fact that there are movies here, that's just like attaches itself to like all of these movies, some of which are, you know, are like documentaries that no one will ever see, but somehow, they bring people like Paris Hilton here.

I was at the party the other night that Perez Hilton and, like DJ AM and Cisco Adler who, I'm not even sure what Cisco Adler does. I just know that I've heard his name before. And they were at this party and Cisco Adler gets a microphone and he, and he goes L.A., did we come here to buy f'n movies or did we come here to f'n party? And everybody just explodes, they were like oh, party.

MARTIN: That pretty much sums it up. Daniel, not put off by the nightlife, by that experience. He went out again last night, except this time, he was on duty for the BPP. He's up early this morning to report back on how unusual it is to find the nightlife here in Utah, specifically just to get a cocktail or a drink.

Dan, how are you doing?

HOLLOWAY: Oh, it's early.

(Soundbite of laughter)

MARTIN: We would also like to point out Dan is not hung over, he just has a bad cold.

HOLLOWAY: Yes.

MARTIN: Right?

HOLLOWAY: Yes. That is correct.

MARTIN: Yeah, that's what we're calling it. Okay, so explain to me when you go into restaurants and bars, what's so unique about just trying to get a drink in Utah?

HOLLOWAY: Well, Utah is - especially when they were bidding on the Olympics a few years ago, Utah's somewhat arcane liquor laws became a good story for the national media. I think the thing that most people are probably familiar with is the mini-bottle rule, which was, which was that you - if you ordered a mixed drink, say, you order like a Margarita on the rocks, they would bring you a mini-bottle of liquor, a mini-bottle of the mixer and a cup of ice.

That rule actually went away many years ago and it's - depending on who you talk to here and either went away of right before the Olympics or it went away in late '80s. And there's a lot of, sort of contradictory information out - out there about what you can and can't do in Utah. One thing is you can't have more than two drinks in front of you. You can, so long as the second drink is just the size of a shot.

If it's a mixed drink, you can't have, you can't be double feasting a Coors Light and, you know, a Jack and Coke at the same time. But you can have a Coors Light and a shot of Jagermeister, which was very popular at the bar that I went to in Pinebrook last night.

MARTIN: Oh, that's unfortunate. That can lead to things.

HOLLOWAY: Yeah, yeah. I had a shot of Jager bought for me actually by the gentleman next to me and, reluctantly, I drank it. And it was the first time I tasted Jager since, I was probably about 21, so…

(Soundbite of laughter)

HOLLOWAY: That's not - that could be contributing to my quote, unquote, "head cold" this morning.

(Soundbite of laughter)

MARTIN: You took one for the team. Now, we went in actually to try to get some food on Main Street a couple of days ago. And we had to sign a voucher?

HOLLOWAY: Yes.

MARTIN: To even get in the place?

HOLLOWAY: Yeah. There's, there are no, technically, there are no bars in Utah. There are restaurants that serve alcohol and there are private clubs. The private club membership, there's a private club deal came around after the mini-bottle rule was gone away with people realizing this is ridiculous. We're just making people, you know, go through this - this silly exercise to drink.

MARTIN: All you have to do is sign your name.

HOLLOWAY: Right. So they came up with the private club rule, which is modeled after things like the Elks Lodge or, you know, any sort of private club to someone who'd join. And you, you know, you have to be a member to drink there. The way that, that people got around this rule was to have a little sheet at the front of the bar that you signed.

And by signing that sheet, you are given a guest membership for a day and you can go in and drink there. Then, and putting, you know, basically what's again circumventing the roadblocks that Utah put up to keep people from drinking.

I had one guy who was, who was drinking next to me, who is a bartender at another bar downtown. He explained it to me this way. Utah's liquor laws are written by people who don't drink and they don't understand how to keep people from drinking. They just understand how to create a lot of paperwork.

(Soundbite of laughter)

MARTIN: Dan Holloway on assignment for THE BRYANT PARK PROJECT at some hooch establishment. Hey Dan, we really appreciate you'd taken the time to do that for us.

HOLLOWAY: Hey, it was no trouble at all.

(Soundbite of laughter)

MARTIN: Take care, take care of your cold. Good luck through the week. We'll check back with you.

HOLLOWAY: All right. Thanks guys.

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