Florida Falls Short in Restoring Felons' Voting Rights Shortly after he was elected a year ago, Florida Gov. Charlie Crist pushed through changes that make it easier for released felons to get their civil rights restored. But only 45,000 of about 950,000 people eligible have had their voting rights restored. The ACLU and other groups have launched a campaign to try to help.
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Florida Falls Short in Restoring Felons' Voting Rights

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Florida Falls Short in Restoring Felons' Voting Rights

Florida Falls Short in Restoring Felons' Voting Rights

Florida Falls Short in Restoring Felons' Voting Rights

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/18288217/18288305" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Shortly after he was elected a year ago, Florida Gov. Charlie Crist pushed through changes that make it easier for released felons to get their civil rights restored. That process, though, has left many dissatisfied.

Only about 45,000 of some 950,000 people eligible have had their voting rights restored. The ACLU and other groups have been holding seminars to reach out to felons and have started a campaign to get them registered to vote.

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