Commentary: 'Funny in Farsi' Iran does not abide by international copyright laws, which means that foreign books get translated and sold without permission from, or payment to, authors. Commentator Firoozeh Dumas heard that there were 19 versions of the latest Harry Potter book on the Iranian market. She didn't want her own book to be translated badly, so she hired her own translator. It's called Funny in Farsi.
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Commentary: 'Funny in Farsi'

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Commentary: 'Funny in Farsi'

Commentary: 'Funny in Farsi'

Commentary: 'Funny in Farsi'

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1844488/1844489" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Iran does not abide by international copyright laws, which means that foreign books get translated and sold without permission from, or payment to, authors. Commentator Firoozeh Dumas heard that there were 19 versions of the latest Harry Potter book on the Iranian market. She didn't want her own book to be translated badly, so she hired her own translator. It's called Funny in Farsi.