Mexican Town Relies on Mezcal to Stem Migration Since World War II, about half the men in a small Mexican pueblo called Zoochila have moved to Los Angeles to find work. Those who stay home are grateful for the dollars sent back, but they don't see migration as a long-term solution to their poverty. Marianne McCune of member station WNYC has this report on Zoochila's attempt to use locally made mezcal to stop Zoochilans from going north.
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Mexican Town Relies on Mezcal to Stem Migration

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Mexican Town Relies on Mezcal to Stem Migration

Mexican Town Relies on Mezcal to Stem Migration

Mexican Town Relies on Mezcal to Stem Migration

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1846265/1846266" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Since World War II, about half the men in a small Mexican pueblo called Zoochila have moved to Los Angeles to find work. Those who stay home are grateful for the dollars sent back, but they don't see migration as a long-term solution to their poverty. Marianne McCune of member station WNYC has this report on Zoochila's attempt to use locally made mezcal to stop Zoochilans from going north.

This report is part of the "Worlds of Difference" series on global cultural change. "Worlds of Difference" is a project of Homelands Productions.