China Banks on Kosher Seal to Revive Food Exports Chinese exporters, facing a recent U.S. backlash over tainted food products, are turning to an unlikely group of inspectors to clean up their act: rabbis. It seems that the Chinese believe that a kosher seal might inspire confidence in American consumers, even those who don't hesitate to mix meat and milk shakes.
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China Banks on Kosher Seal to Revive Food Exports

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China Banks on Kosher Seal to Revive Food Exports

China Banks on Kosher Seal to Revive Food Exports

China Banks on Kosher Seal to Revive Food Exports

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/18842053/18841999" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Chinese exporters, facing a recent U.S. backlash over tainted food products, are turning to an unlikely group of inspectors to clean up their act: rabbis. It seems that the Chinese believe that a kosher seal might inspire confidence in American consumers, even those who don't hesitate to mix meat and milk shakes.

Rabbi Mordechai Grunberg in Jinan, western China, who has been certifying Chinese exports as kosher, talks with Scott Simon.