The Online Predator Myth A new study shows that old notions of Internet predators are overblown. David Finkelhor of the Crimes Against Children Research Center discusses his findings and what parents should really worry about.
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The Online Predator Myth

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The Online Predator Myth

The Online Predator Myth

The Online Predator Myth

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A new study suggests that old notions of Internet predators may be overblown. Madeleine Brand talks to David Finkelhor of the Crimes Against Children Research Center about his research and what parents should really worry about.

"We found that the images that parents and the media have about these crimes are different from what they really are," he says. "It does not look like the Internet is actually the generator of sexual predators."

The adults use the kids' interest in sex and romance to seduce them, he explains. Typically, the adults admit to being older and interested in sex, he says.

This challenges the notion that the Internet is full of old people posing as young people to trick innocents into unwanted activity.