The Bible Gets a Manga Makeover Turmoil, corrupt leaders and crazed prophets. That's what you'll find in "The Manga Bible: From Genesis to Revelation," the ancient text retold through a Japanese style of comic book.
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The Bible Gets a Manga Makeover

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The Bible Gets a Manga Makeover

The Bible Gets a Manga Makeover

The Bible Gets a Manga Makeover

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The Manga Bible Siku hide caption

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Siku

"Manga" is known as a style of Japanese comic book, a sort of cinematic anime full of big-eyed, gangly-bodied action figures.

One Nigerian-educated artist in the U.K. used the style to recreate one of the oldest known texts — the Bible.

Ajinbayo Akinsiku, or "Siku", authored and illustrated The Manga Bible: From Genesis to Revelation. The result chronicles a world full of chaos, corruption and crazed prophets.

"It is the greatest story ever told," said the artist about the Bible."It's material that was primed to be updated."

Siku himself is a believer. He went to theology school and hopes to one day be an Anglican priest.

In his contemporary interpretation of the Bible, Siku portrays Jesus Christ as a super hero. Only the "fantastical" aspects of the bible are told in the 200-page version of the ancient text.

The artist, 42, says the book is a way of re-educating the younger generation that didn't go to Sunday school as he did as a boy.

"These stories are still relevant," he says. "The people in these stories are just like you and I. They have the same passions, same weaknesses and same strengths."