Head Of Medicare, Medicaid Back On Capitol Hill For Health Law Hearing The Senate grills the Obama administration officials being held responsible for the rocky rollout of the Affordable Care Act's federal health insurance marketplace.
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Head Of Medicare, Medicaid Back On Capitol Hill For Health Law Hearing

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Head Of Medicare, Medicaid Back On Capitol Hill For Health Law Hearing

Head Of Medicare, Medicaid Back On Capitol Hill For Health Law Hearing

Head Of Medicare, Medicaid Back On Capitol Hill For Health Law Hearing

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/243281778/243281780" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Senate grills the Obama administration officials being held responsible for the rocky rollout of the Affordable Care Act's federal health insurance marketplace.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish in California this week.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block in Washington where it was another day of tough questions and testimony on Capitol Hill about the Affordable Care Act. Marilyn Tavenner, who has overseen the bumpy rollout of the program, testified before the Senate Health Committee. She said the Healthcare.gov website is getting better every day.

NPR's Tamara Keith is at the Capitol.

TAMARA KEITH, BYLINE: From start to finish, this was a hearing about the people affected by the new healthcare law. It was about Bonnie and Betty and Thomas and Justin. It was senators and their anecdotes.

(SOUNDBITE OF HEARING)

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