Rash of Pelicans Injuries Far from the Sea in Ariz. NPR's Melissa Block speaks with Sandy Cate, coordinator and wildlife naturalist for the Arizona Game and Fish Wildlife Center at Adobe Mountain, about the recent flux of injuries to brown pelicans landing on paved surfaces across the state. The pelicans, miles from their natural habitat of the Sea of Cortez far to the south, are believed to be mistaking heat waves for bodies of water. When they try to land in these mirages, they often break their wings.
NPR logo

Rash of Pelicans Injuries Far from the Sea in Ariz.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/3262031/3262032" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Rash of Pelicans Injuries Far from the Sea in Ariz.

Rash of Pelicans Injuries Far from the Sea in Ariz.

Rash of Pelicans Injuries Far from the Sea in Ariz.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/3262031/3262032" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

NPR's Melissa Block speaks with Sandy Cate, coordinator and wildlife naturalist for the Arizona Game and Fish Wildlife Center at Adobe Mountain, about the recent flux of injuries to brown pelicans landing on paved surfaces across the state. The pelicans, miles from their natural habitat of the Sea of Cortez far to the south, are believed to be mistaking heat waves for bodies of water. When they try to land in these mirages, they often break their wings.