Men and Their Emotions Essayist Alfred Lubrano now feels justified in being a "manly man." He cites a new study from the University of Missouri that suggests the male tendency to withhold emotions may not be as harmful to their psychological health as previously thought.
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Men and Their Emotions

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Men and Their Emotions

Men and Their Emotions

Men and Their Emotions

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/3286029/3286030" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Essayist Alfred Lubrano now feels justified in being a "manly man." He cites a new study from the University of Missouri that suggests the male tendency to withhold emotions may not be as harmful to their psychological health as previously thought.