A Thai Woman's Fight for AIDS Drugs for All Among developing countries, Thailand is second only to Brazil when it comes providing universal access to AIDS drugs. One Thai woman, Krisana Kraisintu, took on government officials and multinational pharmaceuticals to make this drug availability possible. Now she's setting her sights on Africa's AIDS crisis. NPR's Richard Knox reports.
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A Thai Woman's Fight for AIDS Drugs for All

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A Thai Woman's Fight for AIDS Drugs for All

A Thai Woman's Fight for AIDS Drugs for All

A Thai Woman's Fight for AIDS Drugs for All

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/3301021/3301022" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Among developing countries, Thailand is second only to Brazil when it comes providing universal access to AIDS drugs. One Thai woman, Krisana Kraisintu, took on government officials and multinational pharmaceuticals to make this drug availability possible. Now she's setting her sights on Africa's AIDS crisis. NPR's Richard Knox reports.

Krisana Kraisintu and a child living with HIV at the Camillian Social Center in Rayong, Thailand. Krisana invented the antiviral drug GPO-vir, which Thailand is using to provide treatment to more than 35,000 people. Jane Greenhalgh hide caption

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Jane Greenhalgh