Listening to the Northern Lights We experience the sounds of the Aurora Borealis through the ears of sound recorder Steve McGreevy. Very low radio frequencies accompany the Northern Lights and at the equinoxes, when the signals are strongest, McGreevy heads north to listen. He hears the chirps, pops and choruses that play out when the Earth's Magnetic Field interacts with the Sun.
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Listening to the Northern Lights

Only Available in Archive Formats.
Listening to the Northern Lights

Listening to the Northern Lights

Lost and Found Sound: Steve McGreevy's Recordings

Listening to the Northern Lights

Only Available in Archive Formats.

The aurora borealis. Jan Curtis hide caption

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Jan Curtis

Natural Radio recordist Steve McGreevy was in Canada last year for the Northern Lights: not to see them, but to hear them. You can do that, if you have the right equipment. And Steve's got a van full.


Producer Barrett Golding introduces Lost and Found Sound listeners to Natural Radio -- the sound of earth's magnetic field. Like the auroral lights, Natural Radio effects tend to be stronger around the spring and fall equinox, and near the earth's poles. So whenever Steve gets a chance, he heads north, into the wilderness, away from electrical interference, where the listening is best. There's a double CD of Steve's Natural Radio recordings called "Electric Enigma," put out by Dutch East India Trading.

Produced by Barrett Golding.