Atlanta Tavern Loses a Patriarch Reporter Josh Levs remembers an Atlanta institution, Manuel Maloof, who is being buried Monday. The son of Lebanese parents, Maloof became a force in the state's Democratic politics, opening a bar called Manuel's almost 50 years ago that became a main stop on the campaign trail for Democrats running for office -- and a gathering place for local politicians and journalists. Maloof was elected as a top county official.
NPR logo

Atlanta Tavern Loses a Patriarch

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/3853801/3853802" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Atlanta Tavern Loses a Patriarch

Atlanta Tavern Loses a Patriarch

Atlanta Tavern Loses a Patriarch

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/3853801/3853802" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Reporter Josh Levs remembers an Atlanta institution, Manuel Maloof, who is being buried Monday. The son of Lebanese parents, Maloof became a force in the state's Democratic politics, opening a bar called Manuel's almost 50 years ago that became a main stop on the campaign trail for Democrats running for office — and a gathering place for local politicians and journalists. Maloof was elected as a top county official.