Full-Body CT Scans May Boost Cancer Risk New research finds that even one "full-body" CT scan is likely to raise the risk that a person will die from cancer. The finding may give pause to the thousands of healthy people who get such scans each year hoping to prevent serious illness. NPR's Jon Hamilton reports.
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Full-Body CT Scans May Boost Cancer Risk

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Full-Body CT Scans May Boost Cancer Risk

Full-Body CT Scans May Boost Cancer Risk

Full-Body CT Scans May Boost Cancer Risk

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/3882627/3882628" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Full-body CT scans use X-rays to create a 3-D image of a person's torso. That requires about 100 times as much radiation as a mammogram. Corbis hide caption

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Corbis

A CT Scan machine. Corbis hide caption

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Corbis

New research finds that even one "full-body" CT scan is likely to raise the risk that a person will die from cancer. But experts note the greatest increase in risk occurred in patients who underwent multiple scans — which most people are unlikely to need. NPR's Jon Hamilton reports.