Arabic Speakers Flock to U.S. Schools Since the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks, interest in studying Arabic in U.S. colleges and universities has increased dramatically. As NPR's Anthony Brooks reports, the increase is seen as a potential solution to the shortages of Arabic speakers in the U.S. military and diplomatic and intelligence services.
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Arabic Speakers Flock to U.S. Schools

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Arabic Speakers Flock to U.S. Schools

Arabic Speakers Flock to U.S. Schools

Arabic Speakers Flock to U.S. Schools

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/3931307/3931308" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Since the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks, interest in studying Arabic in U.S. colleges and universities has increased dramatically. As NPR's Anthony Brooks reports, the increase is seen as a potential solution to the shortages of Arabic speakers in the U.S. military and diplomatic and intelligence services.