A Visit with the Voters of Broken Bow, Neb. With the 2004 presidential election centering on "battleground states" such as Florida and Ohio, Nebraska gets little attention. The Cornhusker State, with five electoral votes, has voted Republican in every presidential race since 1968. Hear NPR's Liane Hansen.
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A Visit with the Voters of Broken Bow, Neb.

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A Visit with the Voters of Broken Bow, Neb.

A Visit with the Voters of Broken Bow, Neb.

A Visit with the Voters of Broken Bow, Neb.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4078285/4079140" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

With the presidential campaigns focused squarely on "battleground states" such as Florida and Ohio, Nebraska is getting scant attention. It's not just that the Cornhusker State has only five electoral votes. There's also no doubt where they're headed: directly to the Bush-Cheney column. Nebraska has voted Republican in every presidential race since 1968.

But that doesn't mean the voters in Nebraska are unconcerned with national events. The townspeople of Broken Bow have seen several neighbors go off to fight in Afghanistan or Iraq. Economic concerns are reflected in the recent closing of the Ben Franklin variety store. And such events are discussed on a regular basis, as groups of longtime friends gather at the Arrow Hotel to sip coffee and ponder life.

NPR's Liane Hansen visited Broken Bow to learn what the heartland feels about the events of this election season.

Stylist Patty Knoell and customer Brent Myers at the Ache and Pain barber shop. Ned Wharton, NPR hide caption

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Ned Wharton, NPR