An Expensive 1,200-Year-Old Penny NPR's Noah Adams talks with Allan Davisson, a coin dealer who just bought a 1,200-year-old Anglo Saxon penny gold coin for $409,000 ( £230,000). The coin, found by an amateur with a metal detector along a riverside north of London, is the only known coin to bear the name of King Coenwulf of Mercia, who ruled a region of southern England from 796 to 821 AD.
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An Expensive 1,200-Year-Old Penny

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An Expensive 1,200-Year-Old Penny

An Expensive 1,200-Year-Old Penny

An Expensive 1,200-Year-Old Penny

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4107158/4107159" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

NPR's Noah Adams talks with Allan Davisson, a coin dealer who just bought a 1,200-year-old Anglo Saxon penny gold coin for $409,000 ( £230,000). The coin, found by an amateur with a metal detector along a riverside north of London, is the only known coin to bear the name of King Coenwulf of Mercia, who ruled a region of southern England from 796 to 821 AD.