Appeals Courts Flooded with Immigration Cases Federal appeals courts are seeing a wave of immigration cases after changes the Bush administration made to get rid of a backlog at the Board of Immigration Appeals. One appellate court judge says the changes have simply shifted the backlog to the courts, and created what he calls an "intolerable" burden. NPR's Libby Lewis reports.
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Appeals Courts Flooded with Immigration Cases

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Appeals Courts Flooded with Immigration Cases

Appeals Courts Flooded with Immigration Cases

Appeals Courts Flooded with Immigration Cases

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4179087/4179088" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Federal appeals courts are seeing a wave of immigration cases after changes the Bush administration made to get rid of a backlog at the Board of Immigration Appeals. One appellate court judge says the changes have simply shifted the backlog to the courts, and created what he calls an "intolerable" burden. NPR's Libby Lewis reports.