Eddie Williams Exit Interview When Eddie N. Williams moved to Washington, few people knew of the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, or even felt the need for a think tank devoted primarily to issues affecting African Americans. At the time, there were only a few hundred African-American politicians. Thirty-two years later, there are about 10,000. On the eve of Williams' retirement, we discuss the changes he's seen -- and some he hasn't.
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Eddie Williams Exit Interview

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Eddie Williams Exit Interview

Eddie Williams Exit Interview

Eddie Williams Exit Interview

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4190617/4190618" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

When Eddie N. Williams moved to Washington, few people knew of the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies, or even felt the need for a think tank devoted primarily to issues affecting African Americans.

At the time, there were only a few hundred African-American politicians. Thirty-two years later, there are about 10,000. On the eve of Williams' retirement, we discuss the changes he's seen — and some he hasn't.

Guest:

Eddie Williams, president, the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies; retiring Tuesday after 32 years heading the center