Take Two: Goodbye, City Life Joanna Slaybaugh is trading her career at a headhunting firm for dreams of writing and a part-time job. NPR's Ketzel Levine reports in the first of a series on new challenges and goals in the workplace.
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Take Two: Goodbye, City Life

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Take Two: Goodbye, City Life

Take Two: Goodbye, City Life

Take Two: Goodbye, City Life

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Slaybaugh's new town, Pomeroy, Wash., is small enough that people can refer to their phone numbers by only the last four digits. Ketzel Levine, NPR hide caption

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Ketzel Levine, NPR

Joanna Slaybaugh packs her computer into her station wagon on moving day. Ketzel Levine, NPR hide caption

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Ketzel Levine, NPR

Contact Slaybaugh

Joanna Slaybaugh welcomes mail from those going through or considering career changes. Her e-mail address is joannaslaybaugh@hotmail.com.

Some workers today are leaving job security — and lucrative paychecks — in mid-career, lured by pent-up ambitions or a change of pace. NPR's Ketzel Levine begins a series on people reinventing themselves with a report on Joanna Slaybaugh, who is trading her career at a headhunting firm for dreams of writing and a part-time job.

For nearly two decades, Slaybaugh worked in the world of finance. But she says she became disenchanted with her career in recent years, and with the sense of isolation that comes from living in a large city. Now she's moving from Seattle to Pomeroy, Wash., where she was born and where her parents still live.

There, she'll pursue her writing, and work in a store she's loved since childhood, the town's flower and gift shop, the Victorian Rose. She is 40 and divorced, with neither a trust fund nor an ambitious plan. But Slaybaugh sees a trend among her big-city friends, a movement she calls "Back to Mayberry." Like them, she's reinventing her life, and trying to find a sense of place.

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