Army Unit Sorts through Fallen Soldiers' Personal Effects A Maryland Army Unit sorts through the personal effects of fallen U.S. soldiers and returns the items to their families. Linda Faulstitch's son, Ray Jr., was killed just six weeks after arriving in Iraq. NPR's Eric Niiler reports.
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Army Unit Sorts through Fallen Soldiers' Personal Effects

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Army Unit Sorts through Fallen Soldiers' Personal Effects

Army Unit Sorts through Fallen Soldiers' Personal Effects

Army Unit Sorts through Fallen Soldiers' Personal Effects

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4210341/4210342" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A Maryland Army Unit sorts through the personal effects of fallen U.S. soldiers and returns the items to their families. Linda Faulstitch's son, Ray Jr., was killed just six weeks after arriving in Iraq. NPR's Eric Niiler reports.

Linda Faulstitch of Leonardtown, Md., holds combat medals awarded to her son, Army Spc. Ray Faulstitch Jr., who was killed in Iraq on Aug. 5. On her lap is a stuffed camel that belonged to Ray. Eric Niiler for NPR hide caption

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Eric Niiler for NPR