The Truth Behind 'No Hassle' Credit NPR's Madeleine Brand speaks with Day to Day personal finance contributor Michelle Singletary about the so-called "no-hassle" credit cards offered by Capital One and other companies. Many of those cards start out with low interest rates that can later skyrocket. Singletary writes the syndicated column "The Color of Money" for The Washington Post.
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The Truth Behind 'No Hassle' Credit

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The Truth Behind 'No Hassle' Credit

The Truth Behind 'No Hassle' Credit

The Truth Behind 'No Hassle' Credit

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4278737/4278738" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

NPR's Madeleine Brand speaks with Day to Day personal finance contributor Michelle Singletary about the so-called "no-hassle" credit cards offered by Capital One and other companies. Many of those cards start out with low interest rates that can later skyrocket. Singletary writes the syndicated column "The Color of Money" for The Washington Post.

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