Pollsters: 2004 Results Skewed By Young Interviewers On Inauguration Day, a momentary look back at Election Day. Two polling companies -- whose exit polls suggested John Kerry pulling ahead of George W. Bush -- say they've figured out how that happened. The biggest reason-- they say -- is that Kerry supporters were more likely to talk to exit pollsters than supporters of Mr. Bush, some of whom were put off by very young interviewers. One solution: Get older people to do the exit interviews.
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Pollsters: 2004 Results Skewed By Young Interviewers

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Pollsters: 2004 Results Skewed By Young Interviewers

Pollsters: 2004 Results Skewed By Young Interviewers

Pollsters: 2004 Results Skewed By Young Interviewers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4460313/4460314" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

On Inauguration Day, a momentary look back at Election Day. Two polling companies — whose exit polls suggested John Kerry pulling ahead of George W. Bush — say they've figured out how that happened. The biggest reason— they say — is that Kerry supporters were more likely to talk to exit pollsters than supporters of Mr. Bush, some of whom were put off by very young interviewers. One solution: Get older people to do the exit interviews.