Syphilis Epidemics May Reflect Immunity Changes Public health officials regularly attribute epidemics of syphilis to risky sexual behavior. But a new study in the journal Nature suggests the rise and fall of syphilis isn't due to behavioral trends -- it reflects immune fluctuations.
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Syphilis Epidemics May Reflect Immunity Changes

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Syphilis Epidemics May Reflect Immunity Changes

Syphilis Epidemics May Reflect Immunity Changes

Syphilis Epidemics May Reflect Immunity Changes

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4473351/4473352" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Public health officials regularly attribute epidemics of syphilis to risky sexual behavior. But a new study in the journal Nature suggests the rise and fall of syphilis isn't due to behavioral trends — it reflects immune fluctuations.