Identifying the Dead a Slow Process in Thailand Nearly two months after the deadly Indian Ocean tsunami, Thai and foreign workers are still trying to identify the dead and notify families. Many victims continue to live in makeshift camps. Among them are hundreds of children orphaned by the deadly waves.
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Identifying the Dead a Slow Process in Thailand

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Identifying the Dead a Slow Process in Thailand

Identifying the Dead a Slow Process in Thailand

Identifying the Dead a Slow Process in Thailand

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4505031/4506216" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Nearly two months after the deadly Indian Ocean tsunami struck southern Thailand, many victims continue to live in makeshift camps while awaiting the completion of government housing. Among them are hundreds of children orphaned by the deadly waves.

Meanwhile, Thai and foreign forensic workers continue the painstaking, physically and emotionally draining process of identifying the dead.

Doualy Xaykaothao reports from the island of Phuket.

A naked Thai child plays at his home, a temporary shelter inside Bang Muang Camp. Doualy Xaykaothao, NPR hide caption

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Doualy Xaykaothao, NPR