Descriptive Video Helps the Blind Enjoy Films Since 1990, Boston's WGBH has pioneered an audio technology called Descriptive Video Service that offers a detailed explanation of programming and movies for visually-impaired viewers. Mathayu Warren-Lane, a writer, editor and director for the service, joins us for an interview.
NPR logo

Descriptive Video Helps the Blind Enjoy Films

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4513781/4513794" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
Descriptive Video Helps the Blind Enjoy Films

Descriptive Video Helps the Blind Enjoy Films

Descriptive Video Helps the Blind Enjoy Films

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4513781/4513794" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Among the nominees at Sunday's Oscars is the biopic of blind musician Ray Charles, a film that is also being made accessible to visually-impaired audiences with the help of DVS, or Descriptive Video Service.

The Media Access Group at Boston's WGBH founded DVS in 1990, pioneering an audio technology that offers detailed narration of programming and movies for the blind or visually-impaired. DVS is available on headsets at box offices at more than 150 theaters across the U.S. And Ray is now available with narration on DVD.

Mathayu Warren-Lane, a writer, editor and director for DVS, talks about the service with host Scott Simon.