Pentagon Turns to Nontraditional Armor Vendors As the number of U.S. military deaths in Iraq rises, the Pentagon is turning to nontraditional vendors to build and modify their armored vehicles. Among these non-traditional vendors is American Metal Fabricators in Prince Frederick, Maryland. The company typically manufactures stainless steel salad bars, rotisserie-chicken display cases and dish tables for school cafeterias and restaurant kitchens. Now they outfit armor for humvee windshields. American Metal Fabricators President Phillip Poole talks about the process.
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Pentagon Turns to Nontraditional Armor Vendors

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Pentagon Turns to Nontraditional Armor Vendors

Pentagon Turns to Nontraditional Armor Vendors

Pentagon Turns to Nontraditional Armor Vendors

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4523961/4523962" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

As the number of U.S. military deaths in Iraq rises, the Pentagon is turning to nontraditional vendors to build and modify their armored vehicles. Among these non-traditional vendors is American Metal Fabricators in Prince Frederick, Maryland. The company typically manufactures stainless steel salad bars, rotisserie-chicken display cases and dish tables for school cafeterias and restaurant kitchens. Now they outfit armor for humvee windshields. American Metal Fabricators President Phillip Poole talks about the process.