Stored Heat and Climate Change Policy New work published this week in the journal Science indicates that heat already stored in the world's oceans may make an increase in temperatures inevitable -- and the increase was destined to occur even if all greenhouse gases had been stabilized five years ago.
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Stored Heat and Climate Change Policy

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Stored Heat and Climate Change Policy

Stored Heat and Climate Change Policy

Stored Heat and Climate Change Policy

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4541341/4541342" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

New work published this week in the journal Science indicates that heat already stored in the world's oceans may make an increase in temperatures inevitable — and the increase was destined to occur even if all greenhouse gases had been stabilized five years ago.

Guests:

Gerald Meehl, senior scientist. National Center For Atmospheric Research