Line Workers Retiring at Fast Clip Half of the nation's electrical line workers are scheduled to retire over the next five years. It's the oldest average workforce in any industry, and utility companies are scrambling to train new workers.
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Line Workers Retiring at Fast Clip

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Line Workers Retiring at Fast Clip

Line Workers Retiring at Fast Clip

Line Workers Retiring at Fast Clip

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4554625/4554626" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Half of the nation's electrical line workers are scheduled to retire over the next five years. It's the oldest average workforce in any industry, and utility companies are scrambling to train new workers.

Lineman-in-training George Melo drills a hole in a utility pole after securing himself with belt and spikes. Chris Arnold, NPR hide caption

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Chris Arnold, NPR

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