Brooklyn's Basquiat: Art from a Native Son The Brooklyn Museum has become famous for showing some of the very best visual art black America has to offer. Now a new Jean-Michel Basquiat exhibition honors the native son, born and raised in Brooklyn. NPR's Farai Chideya speaks with Brooklyn Museum director Arnold Lehman.
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Brooklyn's Basquiat: Art from a Native Son

Only Available in Archive Formats.
Brooklyn's Basquiat: Art from a Native Son

Brooklyn's Basquiat: Art from a Native Son

Brooklyn's Basquiat: Art from a Native Son

Only Available in Archive Formats.

In Italian, 1983. Acrylic, oil paintstick and marker on wood supports. Jean-Michel Basquiat/The Stephanie and Peter Brant Foundation hide caption

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Jean-Michel Basquiat/The Stephanie and Peter Brant Foundation

In Italian, 1983. Acrylic, oil paintstick and marker on wood supports.

Jean-Michel Basquiat/The Stephanie and Peter Brant Foundation

Untitled, 1980-81. Acrylic and oil paintstick on canvas. Jean-Michel Basquiat/The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat hide caption

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Jean-Michel Basquiat/The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat

Untitled, 1980-81. Acrylic and oil paintstick on canvas.

Jean-Michel Basquiat/The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat

The Brooklyn Museum has become famous for showing some of the very best visual art black America has to offer. Now a new Jean-Michel Basquiat exhibition is added to that list.

The famously ambitious painter died in 1988 of a drug overdose. He was only 27, but Basquiat had already become a superstar in the art world. The exhibit is a fitting tribute to a native son — he was born and raised in Brooklyn, the son of a Haitian-American father and a Puerto Rican-American mother.

Correspondent Farai Chideya found out more about Basquiat from Brooklyn Museum director Arnold Lehman.