'Guest Worker' Immigrants Fill Labor Gap in Maryland President Bush often cites "guest worker" programs as one solution to the problem of illegal immigration. Eric Niiler reports from Maryland's Chesapeake Bay about the effectiveness of the commercial crab industry's own guest worker program, where crab processors often have a difficult time finding people to work the crab-picking lines for low wages.
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'Guest Worker' Immigrants Fill Labor Gap in Maryland

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'Guest Worker' Immigrants Fill Labor Gap in Maryland

'Guest Worker' Immigrants Fill Labor Gap in Maryland

'Guest Worker' Immigrants Fill Labor Gap in Maryland

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4557196/4557197" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

President Bush often cites "guest worker" programs as one solution to the problem of illegal immigration. Eric Niiler reports from Maryland's Chesapeake Bay about the effectiveness of the commercial crab industry's own guest worker program, where crab processors often have a difficult time finding people to work the crab-picking lines for low wages.

Bryan Hall, fourth-generation owner of G.W. Hall and Sons Seafood Co. of Hoopers Island, Md., says he's desperate for immigrant workers. "We're in dire straits right now." Eric Niiler for NPR hide caption

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Eric Niiler for NPR