The Debate Over Public Ten Commandments Displays Later this year, the Supreme Court issues a decision about government displays of the Ten Commandments. Defenders of the displays say that the Commandments are being displayed not to endorse a religion, but to show their influence on the development of American law. Commentator and minister Ian Wrisley says neither argument makes him comfortable.
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The Debate Over Public Ten Commandments Displays

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The Debate Over Public Ten Commandments Displays

The Debate Over Public Ten Commandments Displays

The Debate Over Public Ten Commandments Displays

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4566415/4566416" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Later this year, the Supreme Court issues a decision about government displays of the Ten Commandments. Defenders of the displays say that the Commandments are being displayed not to endorse a religion, but to show their influence on the development of American law. Commentator and minister Ian Wrisley says neither argument makes him comfortable.