Those Crazy MIT Students… Back in 1996, a physicist wrote an entire paper full of meaningless phrases -- and it was published in an academic journal. Now, three students at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have replicated that exposé of academic writing. Their paper was accepted by a scientific conference to be held in Florida. The computer-generated gibberish -- illustrated with charts -- is titled "Rooter: A Methodology for the Typical Unification of Access Points and Redundancy."
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Those Crazy MIT Students…

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Those Crazy MIT Students…

Those Crazy MIT Students…

Those Crazy MIT Students…

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4601888/4601889" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Back in 1996, a physicist wrote an entire paper full of meaningless phrases — and it was published in an academic journal. Now, three students at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have replicated that exposé of academic writing. Their paper was accepted by a scientific conference to be held in Florida. The computer-generated gibberish — illustrated with charts — is titled "Rooter: A Methodology for the Typical Unification of Access Points and Redundancy."