Study Sees Promise in Suspended Animation Technique A study in this week's Science magazine shows that mice exposed to hydrogen sulfide enter a state resembling suspended animation without suffering ill effects afterward. The work bears implications for surgical techniques, better preservation of donor organs and new ways of cooling people with high fevers.
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Study Sees Promise in Suspended Animation Technique

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Study Sees Promise in Suspended Animation Technique

Study Sees Promise in Suspended Animation Technique

Study Sees Promise in Suspended Animation Technique

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4612396/4612397" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A study in this week's Science magazine shows that mice exposed to hydrogen sulfide enter a state resembling suspended animation without suffering ill effects afterward. The work bears implications for surgical techniques, better preservation of donor organs and new ways of cooling people with high fevers.