Ex-Smokers Remain at Higher Risk for Lung Cancer Most smokers believe that if they stop, their risk for developing lung cancer drops quickly. Research shows that quitting is definitely worth the effort. Yet heavy smokers may never lower their risk to the same level as that of those who never smoked.
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Ex-Smokers Remain at Higher Risk for Lung Cancer

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Ex-Smokers Remain at Higher Risk for Lung Cancer

Ex-Smokers Remain at Higher Risk for Lung Cancer

Ex-Smokers Remain at Higher Risk for Lung Cancer

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4622813/4622814" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Most smokers believe that if they stop, their risk for developing lung cancer drops quickly. Research shows that quitting is definitely worth the effort. Yet heavy smokers may never lower their risk to the same level as that of those who never smoked.

Assessing Lung Cancer Risk

This online prediction tool — from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center — can help assess a long-term smoker's risk of developing lung cancer in the next 10 years based on the person's age, sex, smoking history, and asbestos exposure.