Measuring the Success of River Restorations Taxpayers and foundations spend more than $1.5 billion a year to save and restore U.S. rivers, says a new study published in the journal Science. But although billions of dollars are spent on river restoration projects, there is little agreement on how their success is measured. A look at the controversy surrounding reengineering waterways.
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Measuring the Success of River Restorations

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Measuring the Success of River Restorations

Measuring the Success of River Restorations

Measuring the Success of River Restorations

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4624292/4624293" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Taxpayers and foundations spend more than $1.5 billion a year to save and restore U.S. rivers, says a new study published in the journal Science. But although billions of dollars are spent on river restoration projects, there is little agreement on how their success is measured. A look at the controversy surrounding reengineering waterways.