Listener Letters: Snakes, Chutes, and Ladders Host Liane Hansen reads from Weekend Edition Sunday listener mail.
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Listener Letters: Snakes, Chutes, and Ladders

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Listener Letters: Snakes, Chutes, and Ladders

Listener Letters: Snakes, Chutes, and Ladders

Listener Letters: Snakes, Chutes, and Ladders

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4635084/4635085" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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Host Liane Hansen reads from Weekend Edition Sunday listener mail.

LIANE HANSEN, host:

Now for your letters.

And several of you wrote in about Elizabeth Arnold's story last week on the end of wolf hunting season in Alaska's Denali National Park. Bill Ravine wrote, `When I heard that the alpha male and female had been killed, it hit me the same way that the news of Digit, the great gorilla that Dian Fossey had brought to the world, did when he was killed.'

Others wrote in to criticize Alaska's state officials for allowing the hunt. Wendy Ogard(ph) writes, `What a disgusting chapter in Denali Park's history.' She continues, `It's obvious that everything in Alaska is for sale. Hunters willing to pay for the privilege to shoot these wolves have priority over the thousands of tax-paying citizens who would like to view them in Denali National Park.'

We also received comments on our visit to the Smithsonian Institution's Sackler Gallery here in Washington to tour the Asian games exhibit. At the start of the piece, I asked Puzzlemaster Will Shortz whether he knew the original name of the game Chutes and Ladders was actually Snakes and Ladders. Apparently, that wasn't news to many of you. `Liane, Liane, Liane,' scolds Manley Perkle(ph). `I was not born in the USA. And everywhere I ever knew about as a kid, all called the game Snakes and Ladders because you slide down the snakes--Yes, they are pictured as snakes--and climb up the ladders. It was only when I had my own kids in the USA did I discover that the game here is called Chutes and Ladders.'

And finally, several of you responded to the conversation we had with singer Susie Suh. Bri Freeman(ph) from Poughkeepsie, New York, says, `As an undergrad in the late 1980s, the sound of the group Siouxsie and the Banchees left an indelible sound print in my brain. However, about one minute into the story, I became a fan of the new Susie Suh. I got the album, and have played it 100 times.'

Steven Avis(ph) enjoyed Suh's music and our interview with one minor note. He writes, `In the interview, you described Susie's parents as first generation. In fact, Susie is first generation, born in this country, and her parents are immigrants.'

Keep the e-mails coming. Write to us with your thoughts, concerns, both large and small, and you can send them to wesun@npr.org. Once again, that's W-E-S-U-N@O-R-G. Please tell us where you live, as well as how to pronounce your name.

(Soundbite of song)

Ms. SUSIE SUH: (Singing) Ah-oh, oh, oh, oh.

HANSEN: It's 22 minutes before the hour.

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