Fingal's Cave, A Scottish Ocean Cathedral In 1829, composer Felix Mendelssohn visited Fingal's Cave, an ocean cave on an uninhabited island of the Inner Hebrides Islands of Scotland. The cave's cathedral-like beauty inspired the composer to write his popular Hebrides Overture.
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Fingal's Cave, A Scottish Ocean Cathedral

Fingal's Cave, A Scottish Ocean Cathedral

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Fingal's Cave in Scotland

The Inner Hebrides Islands of Scotland are home to Fingal's Cave, a spectacular cliff formation on the uninhabited island of Staffa. At 150 feet long, 46 feet wide and 72 feet high, the cave's cathedral-like dimensions create musical echoes and sounds that have awed visitors for centuries.

When composer Felix Mendelssohn visited Fingal's in 1829, he was so inspired that he began writing music on the spot. His musical notes later became the Hebrides Overture, often called the Fingal's Cave Overture.