Watching the Skies for Deep Impact NASA's Deep Impact projectile run into Comet Tempel 1 at 23,000 mph. The collision should be visible in the United States, west of the Mississippi River, Sunday night; the aftermath should be visible July 4. Robert Siegel talks with Kelly Beatty of Night Sky and Sky and Telescope magazines.
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Watching the Skies for Deep Impact

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Watching the Skies for Deep Impact

Watching the Skies for Deep Impact

Watching the Skies for Deep Impact

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Robert Siegel talks with Kelly Beatty, editor for Night Sky magazine and executive editor of Sky and Telescope magazine. Beatty talks about how amateurs can see NASA's Deep Impact projectile run into Comet Tempel 1 at 23,000 mph.

The comet — and the collision — should be visible in the United States, west of the Mississippi River Sunday night. East of the Mississippi, the aftermath should be visible on July 4 at 11pm.