London Attacks Update NPR's Jackie Northam summarizes the details of Thursday morning's blasts and provides the latest details.
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London Attacks Update

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London Attacks Update

London Attacks Update

London Attacks Update

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NPR's Jackie Northam summarizes the details of Thursday morning's blasts and provides the latest details.

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

We have just been listening to London police and transport officials speaking at Scotland Yard about the bombings this morning in London. NPR national security correspondent Jackie Northam joins me now in the studio to sum up what we've just heard.

JACKIE NORTHAM reporting:

Renee, the police--the main police officer in London said that there were four bomb blasts that ripped through--three of them through The Underground and one on a double-decker bus. The first explosion happened at 8:51 and that--it occurred a hundred yards into The Underground tunnel. They said there were seven people confirmed dead so far on that one. The next one was about five minutes later at a different location, and that--they said there were 21 people confirmed dead on that.

A short while after that, was a place called Edgeware Road, another Underground site. And this one--it blew a hole through the wall of one of the trains into another train, and they're actually investigating whether there were three trains involved in that. And there were five people dead in that incident so far.

And then a fourth one, in under an hour's time from the first explosion, happened on a double-decker bus, and it completely mangled the bus. It was on the top floor of the bus where the bomb went off, and they have no idea--or they are not saying how many fatalities occurred in that incident. So as I said, within an hour's time, we had four major explosions. Now obviously, this is an ongoing situation so those numbers could rise.

The other thing that the top police officer said is that they received no warning that this was going to happen, and so far no claims of responsibility, although there was some talk earlier--this did not come up yet in the press conference--that an al-Qaeda cell had claimed responsibility, but that did not come up.

It's a mess in London right now, too. The head of the under--or the London metro police said that The Underground was out all today. Hopefully, it will open tomorrow. Hopefully, the buses will get started this afternoon. But, you know, millions of people rely on these systems to get in and out of the city and around the city, so it--it's got to be a mess there.

There's also--they've closed a couple of the train stations, and there are bomb threats right now. They said that's, you know--that's not--that happens in these situations. People start calling in bomb threats, so--and then just one last thing is that they've treated 45 people with very serious or critical wounds, and that includes burns, amputations, that type of thing, and over 300 people with minor injuries. And that's where it stands right now.

MONTAGNE: ...very much. NPR national security correspondent, Jackie Northam.

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