Letters: Hurricane Names, Revolutionary War Guest host Sheilah Kast reads comments from listener letters on stories on not-so-fierce hurricane names; Revolutionary War history; and rocker John Hiatt.
NPR logo

Letters: Hurricane Names, Revolutionary War

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4737589/4737590" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Letters: Hurricane Names, Revolutionary War

Letters: Hurricane Names, Revolutionary War

Letters: Hurricane Names, Revolutionary War

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4737589/4737590" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Guest host Sheilah Kast reads comments from listener letters on stories on not-so-fierce hurricane names; Revolutionary War history; and rocker John Hiatt.

SHEILAH KAST, host:

Time now for your letters.

Diane Roberts' essay last week on not-so-fearsome-sounding hurricane names prompted many of you to write. Anna Kanavant(ph) sent this: `While I understand that Diane Roberts may not like hurricanes with wimpy names, as a resident of Pensacola, Florida, now bracing for Hurricane Dennis, it is no less terrifying than preparing for Ivan the Terrible last year. Personally, I'd prefer no hurricanes. But if we must have them, I'd much rather be bracing for Hurricane Ditzy or Fluffy than a storm with a menacing name.'

Also in the electronic mailbag, a couple of listeners offered some hurricane trivia. Sonya Scarsett(ph), from Kirkland(ph), Washington, points out that the word `hurricon'(ph) itself is the name of the Aztec god of storm winds. And David McDowell(ph), from Slidell, Louisiana, reminds us that hurricanes were once named after meteorologists' wives. McDowell says, `Are those not forceful enough?'

Liane Hansen's interview with historian Stanley Weintraub drew this comment from Beth Wigard(ph) of Parkland, Florida. `Professor Weintraub credits demography and the Atlantic Ocean for our victory in the Revolutionary War. But what made this victory even more bitter for the British was that it was made possible by the supplies, troops and naval support provided by Britain's greatest enemy, the French. The park across the street from the White House memorializes not demographics, not any American patriot, but the gallant Marquis de La Fayette, whose countrymen bankrupted their own treasury to help America achieve its independence. Without their financial and military aid, we would still be British citizens today.'

Finally, our performance chat with rocker John Hiatt met mixed reviews. `No more rock music, please,' was the subject line from Nancy Merchant's(ph)? e-mail from Houston. `I can't seem to escape loud, grating, heavy metal music or interviews of artists I've never heard of and have no interest in,' she writes.

Bill Brigham(ph) didn't like Hiatt's voice. `I think he would sound best after about five beers. John Hiatt should not be getting national exposure. Send him back to the Bayou, or just let him play guitar.'

Rebecca Westbrook(ph), from Durant, Oklahoma, took a contrarian view. `Thank you so much for featuring John Hiatt. Over time, I have been exposed to so many great artists on NPR. Now I have begun a fanatic love affair with the music of John Hiatt through your programming.'

You can write to us. Bouquets or brickbats can be sent through our Web site at npr.org. Click on the `Contact' button at the top of the page. Please tell us where you live and how to pronounce your name.

(Soundbite of music by John Hiatt)

KAST: You're listening to WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News.

Copyright © 2005 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our website terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for further information.

NPR transcripts are created on a rush deadline by Verb8tm, Inc., an NPR contractor, and produced using a proprietary transcription process developed with NPR. This text may not be in its final form and may be updated or revised in the future. Accuracy and availability may vary. The authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio record.