The Outing of a CIA Agent, and the Case for Invading Iraq When the Intelligence Identities Protection Act was written, its authors were hardly picturing its use to prosecute top officials in the White House. But the current grand jury has been considering that possibility in the case of CIA operative Valerie Plame. To understand how this came about, a look back to the events of 2002, when the administration was building its case for invading Iraq.
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The Outing of a CIA Agent, and the Case for Invading Iraq

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The Outing of a CIA Agent, and the Case for Invading Iraq

The Outing of a CIA Agent, and the Case for Invading Iraq

The Outing of a CIA Agent, and the Case for Invading Iraq

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4760123/4760138" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
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White House Deputy Chief of Staff Karl Rove has come under tough scrutiny from special prosecutor Patrick Fitzgerald, who is investigating the leaking of CIA operative Valerie Plame's identity.