Charles Phoenix, Finding Kitsch in Kodachrome No one takes slides anymore, but Charles Phoenix collects the best of those that are left to us. He has revived the family slideshow, turning it into performance art. The Los Angeles "histotainer," as he's sometimes called, tells Madeleine Brand about his colorful window into American culture.
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Charles Phoenix, Finding Kitsch in Kodachrome

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Charles Phoenix, Finding Kitsch in Kodachrome

Charles Phoenix, Finding Kitsch in Kodachrome

Charles Phoenix, Finding Kitsch in Kodachrome

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4765737/4766416" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

No one takes slides anymore; their heyday was back in the '50s and '60s. But there are plenty of slides still hanging around, offering their distinct perspective on a certain period of Americana.

Charles Phoenix collects them and has revived the family slideshow, turning it into performance art.

The Los Angeles "histotainer," as he's sometimes called, tells Madeleine Brand about his colorful window into American culture.

A cheerful group gathers outside the Cavalier Motor Inn in Whittier, Calif., 1964. hide caption

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