Bolton Is U.N. Envoy as Bush Bypasses Senate President Bush installs John Bolton as the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, making a recess appointment to circumvent the Senate, where Democrats blocked approval of the nominee. Bolton will be able to serve until a new Congress forms in 2007.
NPR logo

Bolton Is U.N. Envoy as Bush Bypasses Senate

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4780855/4780856" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Bolton Is U.N. Envoy as Bush Bypasses Senate

Bolton Is U.N. Envoy as Bush Bypasses Senate

Bolton Is U.N. Envoy as Bush Bypasses Senate

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4780855/4780856" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Bush announces the appointment of John Bolton as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations in the Roosevelt Room of the White House. Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Reuters

President Bush installed John Bolton as the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations early Monday, making a recess appointment to circumvent the Senate, where Democrats blocked approval of the nominee.

Bolton was first nominated to that job five months ago by the president. But his confirmation process sparked months of struggle in the Senate as Democrats and a few Republicans insisted that he was wrong for the job.

The recess appointment, bypassing Senate confirmation, means that Bolton will serve only until the next Congress convenes, in January 2007.