Foreign Students Find Work (And Fun) by the Seashore A sound montage of voices of foreign students working on the Delaware coast. They speak of their experiences in the United States with Weekend Edition - Sunday summer intern Liliya Karimova.
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Foreign Students Find Work (And Fun) by the Seashore

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Foreign Students Find Work (And Fun) by the Seashore

Foreign Students Find Work (And Fun) by the Seashore

Foreign Students Find Work (And Fun) by the Seashore

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/4789151/4789152" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A sound montage of voices of foreign students working on the Delaware coast. They speak of their experiences in the United States with Weekend Edition - Sunday summer intern Liliya Karimova.

LIANE HANSEN, host:

Seasonal workers are at a premium during the summer months. Resort hotels, restaurants, ice cream parlors and T-shirt shops all need cheap, dependable and polite help. To meet the demand, many employers look overseas. WEEKEND EDITION summer intern Liliya Karimova grew up in the Russian region of Tartarstan. She recently visited Rehoboth, Delaware, and nearby Bethany Beach where she spoke with some other visitors with summer jobs.

Ms. FLORICA BALAS (Summer Employee): My name is Florica Balas. I'm from Romania and I'm studying chemistry there, and I'm 27. Here, I'm selling mostly chocolates, popcorn, like candy. I decide to come here first, for the money, second, for experience. This kind of work I think is fun and I like it and pretty much is an easy job. Here, I start here at 9:00 till 3. By 3:00, I'm working at Atlantic Sands Hotel at the front desk, 3, 11:30, pretty much five days per week and I have two days off or one day, full day and a half. It depends, yes. And after that, we can go out. We go out with friends at clubs and bars and we find time for that, too.

Mr. STEPHEN HILSDON (Summer Employee): My name's Stephen Hilsdon. I am a student from the UK and I study computer science. I came over really to combine two reasons. Firstly, I wanted to work but also I have friends over here who I can't visit unless I can pay--afford to pay for it, which you can only really do by working. I was thinking I might come back next year, but I'll certainly be working abroad again.

Ms. ALINA ARON (Summer Employee): My name is Alina Aron. I'm from Romania. I've been here last summer also and I've worked at the same place. I'm selling--I'm making candies, caramel popcorn, packing, wrapping, whatever it takes, and it's very fun. It is different. Comparative to my country, I think life is a little bit easier. People make money more easily than in my country. I like America so far but it has its good and bad things, like you have more opportunities here, more doors are open for you. The bad things? People are living so easy from other nations. They're really impatient and they just don't know how to react and they overreact, I think. So far I've been in Virginia, Virginia Beach, and New Jersey, but last summer, I've been to New York, Washington, Atlantic City and now I want to see Niagara Falls and Las Vegas, if I have the chance before I go back home.

(Soundbite of singing in foreign language)

HANSEN: WEEKEND EDITION's summer intern Liliya Karimova collected the voices of foreign workers in Rehoboth and Bethany Beach, Delaware. Liliya ends her internship with us today to go to school in Massachusetts.

Thanks a lot for your hard work, and we're going to miss you.

It's 22 minutes before the hour.

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